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What Girl's Need to Do to Be Ready for High School Basketball - An Interview With Renard Beavers

What Girl's Need to Do to Be Ready for High School Basketball

 

Threat is a journey team that offers year round training.
Lisa: Hi Renard! This really is Lisa Williams with Local Online Visibility.
Renard: I'm doing fantastic!
Lisa: I'm doing well, thank you! Today's interview is with Renard Beavers, Varsity Assistant Girls Basketball coach for El Camino High School in Woodland Hills and Head Basketball Coach for Risk Basketball Girl's Travel Team. We are going to go directly to the questions today.
 What is the amount of commitment with a lot of girls playing basketball today?
Renard: Well, I think the amount of commitment is definitely growing. It is pretty high. There are plenty of rec. leagues and travel teams, and there really are a lot of schools which have teams, therefore it's becoming enormous.
Lisa: I am aware at the Pop Warner level and definitely at high school level, boys are very competitive and striving to attain athletic scholarships.
Renard: They're not at the boys level yet, but it is really getting there.
Lisa: And what can you attribute it to?
Renard: I think that info is the key. There is so much more access to info. ESPN is larger now. It ended up being a myth fifteen years, ago but now it is reality.
Renard:
Lisa: Yes it's a lot more obtainable now. I read that with your Threat basketball program your aim is to get the girls ready for the high school level. What would you discover girls are lacking to play on Varsity at the high school level?
Renard: I believe the biggest thing is basketball IQ and court sense, which can be kind of exactly the same thing. The other would be becoming knowledgeable about the speed of the game.
Lisa: Are you able to elaborate on the basketball IQ?
Renard: Yes, since a lot of girls are playing now, that means there's lots of training going on also. A great deal of girl's nowadays can shoot, dribble, pass, and play defense. They know about ball handling practices and defensive slides and a great deal of individual aspects of the game, but the strategy of the game is a lot of times overlooked. I think a great deal of the younger players aren't being taught the strategy as much as the art of the game.
Lisa:
Renard: That's among the most challenging things to teach, but what I try to do is have sections of training where we walk via a lot of scenarios and I describe it. That's one way. Another way is picture. Now it's so easy to get games and practices on picture. It gives the visual tool of the things they're doing right and wrong. From trainer to coach, it's simple to share the game, but when you're talking to some middle school man about basketball you have to remember they may not have the capacity to visualize everything so having film is good, and taking the time to walk through things is good also.
Lisa:
Renard: Yes, I think its two things. That is among these, that boys still normally begin earlier, but another one is boys have more paths to play when it's not on a team. For example, at their elementary or middle school, normally there are definitely going to be more boys playing ball at lunch time. Or you're able to go to the park in order to find a pickup game and there's lots of boys games, but girls, there's not as many games.
Lisa: Good stage. Obviously, they might always play with all the boys, but I suppose that is not going on as much at lunch time and at the park. I'm imagining it is not as appealing to the girls, only some girls.
Renard: There is always going to be a few who will play, but the ratio from girls who are dedicated basketball players to the number that are playing with boys, the ratio is off. There is plenty of girls who simply are not getting in those games. There is a great deal of boys who are not genuinely encouraging them as well. The boys must be more open to letting the girls play together also.
Lisa: And speaking of resources, there are now many more resources, journey teams and such accessible then say ten years past.
Renard: I would say another important thing to do for a girl would be to see games without being a devotee. Assess games on TV, if it be college basketball or professional basketball. Don't just see the ball when you're seeing on TV. Observe the shield. Try to understand what shields are being run. Try to understand exactly what the offensive team is running. Individually observe certain players who actually don't have the ball and mimic what they are doing and pay attention to what they are doing right. I would say watch games with a much better basketball eye. And another thing they can do is practices and abilities. They do not just play when they are at training.
Lisa: That's good. Whether that means they are on the market dribbling or whatever. Develop their skill sets.
Renard: Yes. One thing about girls' basketball, in the event that you are able to do one thing well, that'll get you fairly far and you will work on the others as you go, but learn to do one thing well, whether it's shooting, passing, dribbling or shield.
Lisa: And that brings me to my last question, what suggestions could you advocate to parents of girls who play basketball and to the girls themselves?
Renard: For the parents along with the girls I'd say ask questions. Additionally support your daughter more than trainer your daughter. Some parents wish to trainer nevertheless they occasionally just need to support and let the kids figure it out because they are just children also it does take time to master. For the kids, trying to get in a predicament where in the event that you're not the best one on the team, don't be intimidated by that because it is possible to leapfrog a great deal of players only by devotion.

Threat is a journey team that offers year round training.

 

 

Lisa: Hi Renard! This really is Lisa Williams with Local Online Visibility.

 

Renard: I'm doing fantastic!

 

 

Lisa: I'm doing well, thank you! Today's interview is with Renard Beavers, Varsity Assistant Girls Basketball coach for El Camino High School in Woodland Hills and Head Basketball Coach for Risk Basketball Girl's Travel Team. We are going to go directly to the questions today.

 

 

What is the amount of commitment with a lot of girls playing basketball today?

 

 

Renard: Well, I think the amount of commitment is definitely growing. It is pretty high.NBA live mobile cheats There are plenty of rec. leagues and travel teams, and there really are a lot of schools which have teams, therefore it's becoming enormous.

 

 

Lisa: I am aware at the Pop Warner level and definitely at high school level, boys are very competitive and striving to attain athletic scholarships.

 

 

Renard: They're not at the boys level yet, but it is really getting there.

 

 

Lisa: And what can you attribute it to?

 

 

Renard: I think that info is the key. There is so much more access to info. ESPN is larger now. It ended up being a myth fifteen years, ago but now it is reality.

 

 

Renard:

 

 

Lisa: Yes it's a lot more obtainable now. I read that with your Threat basketball program your aim is to get the girls ready for the high school level. What would you discover girls are lacking to play on Varsity at the high school level?

 

 

Renard: I believe the biggest thing is basketball IQ and court sense, which can be kind of exactly the same thing. The other would be becoming knowledgeable about the speed of the game.

 

 

Lisa: Are you able to elaborate on the basketball IQ?

 

 

Renard: Yes, since a lot of girls are playing now, that means there's lots of training going on also. A great deal of girl's nowadays can shoot, dribble, pass, and play defense. They know about ball handling practices and defensive slides and a great deal of individual aspects of the game, but the strategy of the game is a lot of times overlooked. I think a great deal of the younger players aren't being taught the strategy as much as the art of the game.

 

 

Lisa:

 

 

Renard: That's among the most challenging things to teach, but what I try to do is have sections of training where we walk via a lot of scenarios and I describe it. That's one way. Another way is picture. Now it's so easy to get games and practices on picture. It gives the visual tool of the things they're doing right and wrong. From trainer to coach, it's simple to share the game, but when you're talking to some middle school man about basketball you have to remember they may not have the capacity to visualize everything so having film is good, and taking the time to walk through things is good also.

 

 

Lisa:

 

 

Renard: Yes, I think its two things. That is among these, that boys still normally begin earlier, but another one is boys have more paths to play when it's not on a team. For example, at their elementary or middle school, normally there are definitely going to be more boys playing ball at lunch time. Or you're able to go to the park in order to find a pickup game and there's lots of boys games, but girls, there's not as many games.

 

 

Lisa: Good stage. Obviously, they might always play with all the boys, but I suppose that is not going on as much at lunch time and at the park. I'm imagining it is not as appealing to the girls, only some girls.

 

 

Renard: There is always going to be a few who will play, but the ratio from girls who are dedicated basketball players to the number that are playing with boys, the ratio is off. There is plenty of girls who simply are not getting in those games. There is a great deal of boys who are not genuinely encouraging them as well. The boys must be more open to letting the girls play together also.

 

 

Lisa: And speaking of resources, there are now many more resources, journey teams and such accessible then say ten years past.

 

Renard: I would say another important thing to do for a girl would be to see games without being a devotee. Assess games on TV, if it be college basketball or professional basketball. Don't just see the ball when you're seeing on TV. Observe the shield. Try to understand what shields are being run. Try to understand exactly what the offensive team is running. Individually observe certain players who actually don't have the ball and mimic what they are doing and pay attention to what they are doing right. I would say watch games with a much better basketball eye. And another thing they can do is practices and abilities. They do not just play when they are at training.

 

 

Lisa: That's good. Whether that means they are on the market dribbling or whatever. Develop their skill sets.

 

 

Renard: Yes. One thing about girls' basketball, in the event that you are able to do one thing well, that'll get you fairly far and you will work on the others as you go, but learn to do one thing well, whether it's shooting, passing, dribbling or shield.

 

 

Lisa: And that brings me to my last question, what suggestions could you advocate to parents of girls who play basketball and to the girls themselves?

 

 

Renard: For the parents along with the girls I'd say ask questions. Additionally support your daughter more than trainer your daughter. Some parents wish to trainer nevertheless they occasionally just need to support and let the kids figure it out because they are just children also it does take time to master. For the kids, trying to get in a predicament where in the event that you're not the best one on the team, don't be intimidated by that because it is possible to leapfrog a great deal of players only by devotion.